Frederick and Cora Salmen's 71 Acre Farm Grafton Nebraska , 1915

The Salmen Family Tree

The Salmen genealogy can be traced back to my 11th great-grandfather, Heinrich Salmen (1530 - 1591).

Heinrich , as did 10 generations of Salmen's, lived in Bilton, Canton, Glarus, Switzerland.

The canton of Glarus, also canton of Glaris is a canton in east central Switzerland.

The capital is Glarus. The population speaks a variety of Alemannic German.

The majority of the population identifies as Christian, about evenly split

between the Protestant and Catholic denominations.

For me to be born, I had to have 8,192 Salmen ancestors over 425 years!

I have enjoyed researching our ancestors and gathering their life stories on Ancestry.com

Robert Vincent, September 2020

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Bilton, Canton, Glarus, Switzerland

4,096  tenth great-grandparents

8192  eleventh great-grandparents - Heinrich Salmen (1530 - 1591)

Source: Facebook - Author: Unknown

September 2020

Descendants of Johann Kaspar Salmen Generation 1

1. JOHANN KASPAR1 SALMEN was born on 13 Jul 1796 in Bilten, Glarus, Switzerland. He died on 23 Jul 1869 in New Glarus, Green, WI. He married Columbina Lienhard, daughter of Johann Conrad Lienhard and Anna Mueller, on 06 Mar 1827 in Bilten, Glarus, Switzerland. She was born on 17 Nov 1799 in Bilten, Glarus, Switzerland. She died in 1878 in Hornell, Steuben, NY.

Johann Kaspar Salmen was buried in New Glarus, Green, WI.

Notes for Johann Kaspar Salmen:
JohKaspar was a weaver by trade and very hard of hearing, which excused him from military service.

Church records show JohKaspar was buried in the Reformed Church's cemetery in New Glarus, WI; however his headstone could not be found because the grave was moved several times due to church building expansions. There is no City of New Glarus record of his re-internment when all church graves were finally moved to the city's cemetery.

M. Grassli, the church pastor in Bilten, wrote a letter, dated 3 May 1952, to Fred H. Salmen of Boston, stating JohKaspar lived in a large house located 'up the hill' in a prominent position in Bilten. (He was the same person who provided Fred and family assistance when they visited Bilten in June 1950, the first USA descendant to do so.) This statement was given wide publication in the Salmen Genealogy's Second Edition, issued at the 1969 reunion, and soon became accepted as accurate "family lore". As a result,various descendants visited Bilten over the years and saw, photographed and toured the imposing house known locally as Ritterhaus (Knights House) and shared their visits with other extended family members.

However, relatively recent research done by a Glarus realty company showed that Salmen family members never had ownership before, or during, the mid-19th century emigration period when JohKaspar's family departed. At the turn of the 20th century, house ownership was divided in two parts, with one-half ending-up in the possession of a Salmen family. Single-family ownership was restored in 1946 to non-Salmens. The "last" Salmen of Bilten, Maria Elisa (b. 27 Feb 1868), was living there when she died in 1947. An English translation of the complete realty report was done by Salmen descendant Kathy Kauhl Johansen and made available to attendees at the 2014 Salmen reunion.

From Glarus genealogist Patrick Wild: The note made by Glarus official J.J. Kubly-Muller during his Bilten research efforts in the early 20th century, says the family lived at the "untergasse", which means lower alley, "like his parents".

In October 2018, Glarus research found records from community meetings showing that JohKasper and family were in "very poor circumstances" (i.e. dire poverty) in February 1849 when he petitioned the community for economic assistance to emigrate to the USA. At that time he had no home ownership and they lived with another family. In records identified in later Notes, the petition was made on behalf of his son Caspar, under age 14, since he "will shortly emigrate to America and won't ever benefit from the community of Bilten". As was a Swiss custom of the time, daughters did not have the same benefits as sons. Once a daughter married, she lost her citizenship of Bilten, whereas a son always kept theirs.

Research Notes:
Johann Kaspar's family is recorded as No. 34 in Bilten's book of families.

Genealogical research in Bilten and Glarus was done in late 2018 by Ms. Susanne Peter-Kubli, a historical researcher in Canton Glarus; this work was commissioned by JohKaspar's great-great grandson, Fredric G. Salmen. JohKaspar's petition to local officials for economic assistance for emigrating can be found in the "Gemeinderatsprotokoll of 28 Jan 1849", the "Gemeindeversammlungsprotokoll of 11 Feb 1849" and "Amtsblatt of 3 Feb 1849". Amtsblatt proceedings for Feb 10 & 17 listed other Bilten persons also seeking emigration, some of whom were identified as arriving with the Salmen family in NYC on 4 April 1849. Records for the "Armenpflege" committee (i.e. care of the poor) were not able to be located, and probably no longer exist. As a result, the researcher believes the actual amount of money received can not be determined.

This ship's passenger manifest was, unfortunately, fraught with errors that can now be considered a result of ineptitude and/or carelessness. The April 4 arrival has long been known as the probable vessel for the 3 children, but the two accompanying adults could not, as written, be construed as JohKaspar and Columbina; instead it was thought they were older Salmen 3rd cousins, Rudolf and Kaspar (sons of

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Descendants of Johann Kaspar Salmen Generation 1 (con't)

and Columbina; instead it was thought they were older Salmen 3rd cousins, Rudolf and Kaspar (sons of weaver Jacob Salmen) who did indeed go to New Bilten, WI. The 2018 research found these two brothers emigrated at different times. Also, other Bilten citizens,mentioned with JohKaspar in the above Glarus documents, were identified on that ship's manifest. Considering all the findings together, the family's 1849 emigration as a unit can be accepted.

The "Ritterhaus" report on the Bilten house was prepared by Gisler Consulting and Trading, AG, a real estate company located in Ennenda, Glarus. Although no author or date was included on the original document, it was probably written about 2010 for their commercial business.

It is not known why, upon arrival, this family stayed in NYC vs. going directly to the new, Glarus-oriented settlements in Wisconsin with other Glarners. The 2018 research found some kind of support network for Swiss immigrants existed in the lower west side of Manhattan, but details could not be identified.
We know the initial two New Glarus "scouts", Messrs. Durst and Streiff, when they arrived in NYC on 26 April 1845, went immediately to the same general area of Manhattan before heading west in their search for an adequate settlement. A "Swiss Benevolent Society" was identified in NYC during this time period, but its records could not be found. There was also an "Emigration Society of Glarus" in Switzerland, but the Glarus researcher could find no formal link to SBS in NYC, nor was one suspected.

Columbina Lienhard was buried in Hope Cemetery; Hornell, NY.

Notes for Columbina Lienhard:
Both the 1855 and 1865 NY census show her visiting with daughter Anna (Mrs. Rudolf) Tschachtli in Rochester, NY (Ward 6).

After Kaspar's death, Columbina moved permanently from Wisconsin to Hornell, NY to live with the Tschachtli's and grandson Henry Salmen (first-born child of Caspar & Mary). The 1875 NY Census shows her living with the family, at age 75, along with grandson Henry. She is buried in the Tschachtli family plot in Hornell.

Research Notes:
The ancestors of Columbina, and their respective family groups, are based on a report prepared by Landesarchiv in Glarus, Switzerland in June 2010. This was work commissioned by her great-great grandson Fredric G. Salmen.

Relationship Notes for Johann Kaspar Salmen and Columbina Lienhard:
Contrary to published family lore in the 1969 update of the Salmen Genealogy, the entire family emigrated together, arriving in New York City on 4 April 1849. It is not known exactly where they lived upon arrival, but one may assume they all stayed together in an area of SW (lower west side) Manhattan that our research found was popular with Swiss immigrants. A possible street address, of 136 Liberty St., was identified from the church book recording daughter Maria's residence at the time of her wedding in July 1850.

It is believed the parents, and perhaps Caspar, followed daughter Maria and family to Brookfield, Waukesha Township, near Milwaukee, WI. During the 1855 NY census, Columbina was listed as being with daughter Anna in Rochester, NY. The whereabouts of husband JohKaspar and son Caspar at that time cannot be confirmed, but both are suspected of being in Brookfield, WI with daughter Maria (Mrs. Melchior) Marti. This because the 1855 WI census records 2 additional foreign-born males living there.

Later, the couple moved with their children Maria and Caspar, and their respective families, to Washington Township in Green County, WI. The actual timing is not known because the Marti's left first, while son Caspar tried to develop a woodworking trade in Milwaukee. Also, Columbina was noted as being in Rochester, NY for that state's 1865 census.

Johann Kaspar Salmen and Columbina Lienhard had the following children:

i.

ANNA MARIA2 "MARIA" SALMEN was born on 27 Sep 1828 in Bilten, Glarus, Switzerland. She died on 19 Apr 1904 in Monticello, Green, WI. She married Melchior Marti, son of Rudolf Marti and Rahel Schlittler, on 19 Jul 1850 in New York. He was born on 19 Oct 1828 in Bilten, Glarus, Switzerland. He died on 07 Jun 1891 in Washington Twp, Green, WI.

Anna Maria "Maria" Salmen was buried in Washington Church Cemetery, Green Co., WI.

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Descendants of Johann Kaspar Salmen Generation 1 (con't)

Notes for Anna Maria "Maria" Salmen:
Maria married Melchior Marti in New York City; any previous, formal relationship in Bilten is unknown. At the time of her marriage, it is assumed Maria lived with her family at 136 Liberty St. in Manhattan's lower west side; the street address was from the church's record of her wedding.

After Melchior's death, Maria moved to a house in nearby Monticello, WI. In 1901, according to Mabel Kleinschmidt, Maria, along with (sister) Anna and Rudolf Tschachtli, came to NE to visit their brother Caspar prior to his death.

Research Notes:
Most of the information on descendants of daughter Maria Louisa is from a January 1984 Klassy Family Genealogy published by Lillian Klassy Hefty. That for daughter Anna is from Rootsweb info posted by a Charles Brooks. That for son Johann Casper is from Edward Marty's January 1971 family genealogical work. Some information on spouses of other children was obtained from Swiss American Historical Review, Vol 44, No 1, Feb 2008, pg 41. Some dates and names of grandchildren are estimates from census data. The information was transcribed by Fredric G. Salmen into a commercial electronic database designed for genealogical use.

Melchior Marti was buried in Washington Church Cemetery, Green Co., WI.

Notes for Melchior Marti:
The Switzerland spelling of the family name was "Marti"; USA born descendants are recorded as "Marty".

At the time of his marriage, Melchior was listed in the church's record book as living at 49 Dey St. in Manhattan's lower west side; no occupation was listed. Some time after marriage, the couple moved from the 8th ward of NYC to the city's 3rd ward, and later to New Jersey. It is not known what type of work he did in either NYC or NJ.

The Klassy Family Genealogy says their first child was born in Newark, NJ (same was assumed for second child). Sometime prior to 1855, the family moved to Brookfield, near Milwaukee, WI. In 1863 Melchior and Maria moved to Washington Township, Green County and settled on a farm (a few miles west of the Klassy farm).

Research Notes:
Information on Melchior's ancestors was obtained from two sources. A report prepared in June 2010 by Landesarchiv in Glarus, Switzerland from "Family Marti No. 25 Town of Bilten". It includes 9 generations going back to 1580, the earliest Marti recorded in the Bilten records. This work was commissioned by Fredric G. Salmen.

In October 2010 a copy of the Marti family genealogy, published in January 1971 by Edward W. Marty, Jr. (b. 27 Dec 1931) a great-grandson of Melchior and Maria, was received that also had Marti ancestors back to the same Swiss patriarch. The ancestral data were compared with that from Landesarchiv and both are used; in case of conflict, that for Landesarchiv survives. Edward's work also had information on Melchior's and Maria's descendants.

A large public tree on Ancestry.com (owner "wildpat") lists many descendants of Glarus' emigrant families, including Salmen and Marti. For this Marti family, the list of descendants identified is more than included in this database. I have communicated with "wildpat", whose formal name is Patrick Wild, and lives in Canton Glarus, Switzerland. He says his sources are other public trees and on-line data; no attempt at corroboration of his data with Marti descendants from WI has been attempted at this writing.

A statement made by Edward Marty, in his 1971 publication, says "it is not known exactly when Melchior Marti came to the USA". In November 2018, after the Salmen family emigration situation was confirmed, another attempt was made by Salmen descendant Kathy Kauhl Johansen to locate Melchior's immigration ship records on-line. Although it is possible he arrived in NYC with other Bilteners (including those

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ii.

Relationship Notes for Melchior Marti and Anna Maria "Maria" Salmen:
They were married at the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Saint Matthew located on Walker St., near the intersection with Mott St. in Manhattan's lower west side.

Their marriage record was located by Kathy Kauhl Johansen in August 2017 on microfilm of the church's marriage book (1846-54) at the NYC Public Library, Schwarzman Building--Milstein Division, reel 3.

ANNA SALMEN was born on 15 Nov 1833 in Bilten, Glarus, Switzerland. She died in 1907 in Hornell, Steuben, NY. She married Johann Rudolf Tschachtli, son of Benedict Tschachtli and Anna Barbara Jaques, on 30 Jun 1851 in New York City, NY. He was born on 23 Jan 1823 in Kerzers, Fribourg, Switzerland. He died in Nov 1906.

Anna Salmen was buried in Hope Cemetery; Hornell, NY.

Notes for Anna Salmen:
Prior to marriage, it is believed Anna lived at 136 Liberty St., in Manhattan's lower west side, with her family. No address was recorded for her in the church's wedding book.

Anna and Rudolf had no children, but they raised her nephew, Caspar's eldest child Henry from Wisconsin, when he did not want to go to NE. Anna's mother, Columbina, also lived with them after JohKaspar's death in New Glarus, WI. The NY census records for 1855 and 1865 show Columbina as being with them in Rochester (Ward 6), probably on visits.

In 1901, according to Mabel Kleinschmidt, Anna and Rudolf Tschachtli, along with her sister Maria, came to NE to visit their brother Caspar prior to his death.

Johann Rudolf Tschachtli was buried in Hope Cemetery; Hornell, NY.

Notes for Johann Rudolf Tschachtli:
See Notes for his father Benedict for information on his birth family in Kerzers, Switzerland.

Rudolf received a good common-school education. In 1841, after the death of his father, he learned the upholstering and furniture trade; he later moved to Paris. In 1848, along with 3 other Swiss men, he emigrated to New York City, arriving on the vessel "Queen Victoria", from LeHavre, in September. He found employment in this trade as was recorded as an "upholsterer" on the 1850 NY census while living in the city's Fifth Ward.

At the time of marriage, Rudolf was living at 149 Lombard St. in the lower west side of Manhattan and employed as an upholsterer. He obviously had talent because in 1853, he and Anna moved to Rochester, NY when he became foreman of the Brewster & Fenn furniture factory. In 1866, they moved to Hornell where he established his own furniture business of (J.M.) Deutsch & Tschachtli.

Research Notes:
A researcher will find many different phonetic variations of this surname. Salmen descendant Kathy Kauhl Johansen was finally able to locate the ship's manifest and census records.

For more on Brewster & Fenn, see "Landmarks of Steuben County, New York; by Harlo Hakes, 1896"; this research identified by Kathy's mother, Dorothy Softley Kauhl.

Relationship Notes for Johann Rudolf Tschachtli and Anna Salmen:
It is not known how the couple met in NYC. They were married at the Evangelical

Descendants of Johann Kaspar Salmen Generation 1 (con't)

on-line. Although it is possible he arrived in NYC with other Bilteners (including those with Salmen and Marti surnames) arriving on the ship Columbia on 9 June 1847, no definitive passenger manifest record with his name has been found. His USA Naturalization record does not include an immigration arrival date. A subsequent investigation in January 2019, by the historical researcher in Canton Glarus, was unable to locate any local documents showing when he emigrated.

iii.

Their marriage record was located by Kathy Kauhl Johansen in August 2017 on microfilm of the church's marriage book (1846-54) at the NYC Public Library, Schwarzman Building--Milstein Division, reel 3.

JOHANN CASPAR SALMEN was born on 09 Apr 1835 in Bilten, Glarus, Switzerland. He died on 10 Nov 1901 in Sutton, Clay, NE. He married (1) MARIA "MARY" KREBS, daughter of Bernhard Krebs and Magdalena Stegmann, on 19 Jan 1860 in Brookfield, Waukesha, WI. She was born on 10 Feb 1837 in Kirchdorf, Bern, Switzerland. She died on 05 Oct 1877 in Sutton, Clay, NE. He married (2) MARGARET FOLTZ, daughter of Johannes Volz and Christine Franck, on 20 Dec 1883 in Grafton, Fillmore, NE. She was born on 19 Jan 1862 in Hilsbach, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. She died on 20 Dec 1945 in Sutton, Clay, NE.

Johann Caspar Salmen was buried in Farmer's Valley Cemetery; Hamilton Co., NE.

Notes for Johann Caspar Salmen:
The baptismal record in Bilten has the name Johann Kaspar, identical to his father. The Johann was apparently "dropped" after arrival in the USA and eventually the Germanic "K" spelling became replaced with the Anglicized "C".

Caspar, with his two sisters and parents, arrived in New York City on 4 April 1849. It is believed the family lived together at 136 Liberty St. in the lower west side of Manhattan. Family lore said Caspar delivered goods for a merchant, but no supporting documentation has been found. At some point, he acquired woodworking skills, probably with the assistance of brother-in-law Rudolf Tschachtli. Later, it is possible Caspar followed him to Rochester, NY when Rudolf became foreman at the Brewster & Fenn furniture factory, but, again, no documentation has been found. If he did, he did not stay long, since it appears he moved to WI prior to the respective state census for both NY and WI in 1855.

The 1860 Federal Census, done after marriage in WI, lists his occupation as a "farm laborer". Later, Caspar tried to establish a cabinet maker trade in Milwaukee at "Fifth & Tamarack" streets; this per a listing in the 1862 Milwaukee City Directory. According to family lore, he was not financially successful and, during the Civil War, went to Nashville, TN to make coffins and wagons for the Union Army. Returning home after the war, there was still difficulty earning enough money for his growing family so, in 1866, he moved the family to a farm near Monticello, Green, WI, near where sister Maria Marti lived.

In 1875 the expanding family, except for oldest child Henry, who moved to Hornell, NY to live with his Aunt Anna Tschachtli, went by covered wagon (and walking) to Fillmore County, NE. Caspar rented a farm the first year while living with the Linders, another Swiss emigrant family. He then bought railroad land and built a 2-room dugout as a home. After Mary's death, a wood-framed house was built and served as the family's home.

Six years after Mary's death Caspar remarried, to Margaret Foltz, apparently a housekeeper for the neighboring Linders.

In 1901, according to Mabel Kleinschmidt, Caspar's sisters Maria and Anna, and husband Rudolf Tschachtli, came to NE to visit prior to Caspar's death.

Research Notes:
Information for descendants of Caspar Salmen was obtained mainly from 4 sources published for family members: Genealogy Update of the Salmen Family in America 1849-1994,Third Revised Edition; Salmen Family Update 1995-2004; Update 2005-2009; and Update 2010-2014.

Information for ancestors of Caspar Salmen was obtained mainly from the "Cronik der Salmen Familie von Bilten" compiled in Glarus, Switzerland for Fred Wilhelm Salmen of

Descendants of Johann Kaspar Salmen Generation 1 (con't)

It is not known how the couple met in NYC. They were married at the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Saint Matthew located on Walker St., near the intersection with Mott St. in Manhattan's lower west side.

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Descendants of Johann Kaspar Salmen Generation 1 (con't)

Salmen Familie von Bilten" compiled in Glarus, Switzerland for Fred Wilhelm Salmen of New Orleans, LA for his branch of the family (see Notes for Johann Fridolin Salmen b. 17 Mar 1828). The work was done initially in 1914, and updated in 1930, by Mr. J.J. Kubly-Muller of Glarus. Fred Henry Salmen of Boston, MA, son of Caspar's first-born Henry, had it translated into English and distributed to family members in 1949.

All information about descendants and ancestors was transcribed by Caspar's great-grandson Fredric G. Salmen into a commercial electronic database designed for genealogical use and made available to family members at the 2014 Reunion.

Maria "Mary" Krebs was buried in Farmer's Valley Cemetery; Hamilton Co., NE.

Notes for Maria "Mary" Krebs:
Genealogical research conducted in 2018, both in Switzerland and USA, corrected several items of family-lore concerning Mary: her maiden surname, birth date, and marriage location to Caspar Salmen.

She was the oldest child in a family of 6 that arrived in New York City on the ship "Gerogia" (sic) about 22 July 1852. The parents were from Canton Bern where her father was a farm laborer. The family was quite destitute and the Kirchdorff community financially assisted their emigration to the USA. After arrival, the family seems to have traveled straight to Wisconsin, settling in Milwaukee County where her father must have been able to find work. Their nearby post office of West Granville was about 10 miles from the Brookfield Center post office of the Marti family. All 6 family members are listed in the 1855 state census, but the 1860 federal census does not list Maria as part of a now 5-member family group. For more information, please refer to Notes for her parents and siblings.

Research Notes:
The name "Krepts" does not appear in the authoritative book on Swiss family names; the phonetically similar "Krebs" is found in this book and villages associated with that name are located primarily around Bern, in western Switzerland. The Wisconsin record of marriage, in a civil ceremony, has the phonetic surname spellings of "Salsman" and "Cribbs"; neither the bride's nor groom's parents' names are included.

Mary's birth parents, siblings and respective ancestors were identified by a records search done by a Bern, Switzerland genealogist, Mr. Peter Walti, in early 2018. This work was commissioned by Mary's great-grandson Fredric G. Salmen.

Relationship Notes for Johann Caspar Salmen and Maria "Mary" Krebs: Documentation on the civil marriage was found by their great-great-grand daughter Kathy Kauhl Johansen in August 2017. It is on Wisconsin Historical Society microfilm 1,275,596; folder 7622491, image 1880. It is not known where, how, or when Caspar and Mary met, but it had to be in Wisconsin.

Margaret Foltz was buried in Sutton, Clay, NE.

Notes for Margaret Foltz:
Velma Salmen Greenfield remembers her mother (Esther) saying Margaret and brother John came to USA with their parents, first going to Iowa. After a while, a sister who remained in Germany became ill (and may later have died). The parents returned to Germany to take care of the daughter and her family. Where, and with who they lived, in Iowa is not known currently, nor the circumstances that brought the two siblings to Nebraska.

How and when Margaret met Caspar is not known although she apparently worked as a hired girl for the Linders; this is the same family mentioned in Caspar's Notes. After marriage, Margaret took the large Salmen family "in stride" and was readily accepted by Caspar's children with first wife Mary. She remained on the family farm until 1913 when she and her younger children moved to Sutton. Sons Frank, and later Ray, lived on the farm until 1948 when it was sold. Margaret was buried in Sutton Cemetery beside daughter Eva, who did not marry.

Descendants of Johann Kaspar Salmen Generation 1 (con't)

Velma also remembers her mother saying Margaret and Caspar had some difficulty communicating because Margaret spoke 'low' German while Caspar spoke a Swiss version of 'high' German.

Research Notes:
Information about siblings Margaret and John Foltz, and their ancestors, was obtained by a professional German genealogist, Friedrich R. Wollmershaeuser, in work commissioned by Fredric G. Salmen, in 2011. He researched the books of Weiler Evangelical Church and Adelshofen Lutheran Church kept at state archives in Karlsruhe. Weiler is in the parish of Hilsbach. The town's location is frequently described as Weiler am Steinsberg. A copy of his report has been shared with some descendants of Margaret and John.

For Margaret's birth information, refer to her parents' Relationship Notes.

The English "Foltz" will be used for Margaret (and brother John) but the German "Volz" for her parents and siblings that remained in Germany. The marriage license issued to Caspar and Margaret had her maiden surname (mis-spelled) as "Falls".

Prepared By: Preparer: Phone: Email:

Fredric G. Salmen +1-281-554-7070 fredsalmen@comcast.net

Address:

2005 LaSalle Lane League City, Texas 77573 USA

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January 14, 2019

Dear Salmen Cousin,

Most of you received an e-mail from me in September 2018 which included the results of genealogical research done in Canton Bern, Switzerland concerning Maria (Mary) Krebs, Caspar Salmen’s first wife. This research overturned incorrect family-lore that had been published, and persisted, about Mary for many years, i.e. her birth family, their ancestral lineage and her marriage location to Caspar.

Afterwards, this accomplishment got me thinking about another “unknown” we still have in Salmen family-lore: When did Caspar’s parents actually emigrate from Bilten, Switzerland and under what circumstances? And a later question: When did Melchior Marti (Caspar’s brother-in-law) emigrate from Bilten? I subsequently commissioned historical research in Canton Glarus, Switzerland to try and find documentation to confirm, or correct, published family-lore that the 3 children came before their parents. Alas, that was not true; the entire family travelled together arriving in New York City on 4 April 1849 and settling together, initially, in NYC. No confirming records could be found regarding M. Marti’s departure from Bilten, or arrival in NYC. The attachment summarizes all the information known currently about the 5 family members, their immigration to the USA, respective spouses, and eventual moves to Wisconsin and

Nebraska. (Note: There is some redundancy of information between different family members when viewed as a family group; that is done purposely since other report options exist that may only contain one family member.)

As with the prior Krebs information, all the findings have been summarized and entered into the “Salmen Family Tree” I maintain in an electronic genealogical database (Family Tree Maker). This is the same database, and its reports, that was offered to attendees at the 2014 Salmen Family reunion, and will be again be offered to all family members at the next reunion. The attachment is a standard genealogical report produced from FTM.

Please forward this e-mail and attachment to any other Salmen descendants you know that may be interested in learning more the family’s arrival from Switzerland. Similarly, if you would want an electronic version of the database, or certain parts there-of, please let me know; also for any questions.

Regards, Fred Salmen

Prepared By: 2005 LaSalle Lane League City, Texas 77573 USA Address: Phone: +1-281-554-7070 Email: fredsalmen@comcast.net Preparer: Fredric G. Salmen Page 7 of 7 Monday, January 14, 2019